Search Results for “bias”

Moral hazard and the revised DOJ compliance standards

One of the great afflictions of our age is moral hazard. As noted in an earlier post: “The concept of moral hazard was used originally to refer to the phenomenon that providing insurance tended to promote risky behavior by insured parties.  Subsequently, the idea has been applied more generally to mean […]

Mapping the field of “”behavioral business ethics”

In “Toward a Better Understanding of Behavioral Ethics in the Workplace,”  David De Cremer of the Business School, National University of Singapore, and Celia Moore of the Cambridge Judge Business School, review literature that is part of the growing area that they call “behavioral business ethics.” They use this formulation […]

The gut as accomplice

A review of core behavioral ethics concepts (“Rule-breaking without Crime: Insights from Behavioral Ethics for the Study of  Everyday Deviancy” by Yuval Feldman, Benjamin van Rooij and  Melissa Rorie) noted: “Behavioral Ethics has shown that … people relying on System 1 cognition (characterized by intuitive and emotional decision making, more […]

Will working at home make us more ethical?

Research we reported on several years ago suggests it could. In “Truth Telling: A Representative Assessment,” published in October by the Institute for the Study of Labor in Bonn, Johannes Abeler, Anke Becker and Armin Falk report on the results of two recent studies in Germany which suggest that individuals […]

The oldest conflict of interest

Many years ago a client being vetted for a high-ranking post asked me if a question about prior ethical violations required him to disclose a long since concluded extramarital affair. I replied that this seemed beyond the scope of the question, and I would give the same answer if asked today. But […]

“Corporate Law for Good People”

Compliance programs have long been viewed (at least by me) as a “delivery device” for bringing behavioral ethics ideas and information into the workplace. And now something similar can be said about corporate governance. In Corporate Law for Good People Yuval Feldman, Adi Libson (both of Bar-Ilan University) and Gideon […]

The 2020 behavioral ethics and compliance index

While in the more than eight years of its existence the COI Blog  has been devoted primarily to examining conflicts of interest it has also run quite a few posts on what behavioral ethics might mean for corporate compliance and ethics programs. Below is an updated version of a topical  index […]

Does compliance have a dark side?

Many years ago, the CEO of a client company told me that he wanted to fire another corporate officer there. I asked him what basis he had for this contemplated action and he said it was that the officer had failed to take mandatory compliance training. I responded by asking […]

Is ethics being short-changed by compliance?

In the beginning of this field there was ethics. But with the advent of the Sentencing Guidelines in 1991 compliance entered the picture and where there were once ethics programs now stand “compliance and ethics” ones. Has ethics been short-changed in this transition? In a recent posting in the Harvard […]

Sweating the small stuff

In Behavioral Ethics as Compliance  (Cambridge Handbook of Compliance (Van Rooij & Sokol Eds)) Yuval Feldman and Yotam Kaplan write: “[C]urrent approaches to law enforcement and compliance tend to focus on “smoking guns” and extreme violations of the law as the core case and as the ultimate manifestation of the […]