International Chamber of Commerce publishes conflict of interest guidelines

The International Chamber of Commerce – apparently the world’s largest business organization – recently published Guidelines on Conflicts of Interest in Enterprises. It is available for free download here.

Among other things, the Guidelines provide a useful summary of what should generally be included in a COI compliance policy:

Objective: first, the prevention of Conflicts of Interest, and if nevertheless they do arise, dealing with them, disclosing them and finally mitigating the risks of them arising;

Scope: applicable and binding for all directors, officers, managers, employees, agents and representatives (Associates) of the Enterprise;

Definitions: include clear definitions;

Provisions:

– comply with all applicable laws and regulations in addition to internal regulations of the Enterprise, including privacy laws and policies;

– all decisions and actions by all Associates shall be taken in the best interest of the Enterprise;

– Associates shall not take business opportunities that belong to the Enterprise for themselves;

– Associates shall immediately disclose any Conflicts of Interest;

– Associates shall abstain or withdraw from debating, voting, or other decision-making processes or activities when a Conflict of Interest exists or might arise;

– Senior Management shall lead by example and give guidance on Conflicts of Interest;

– job applicants and newly hired or appointed Associates shall disclose any Conflicts of Interest immediately during the hiring or appointment process;

– every member of Senior Management shall update his/her disclosure on Conflicts of Interest at least annually to the Compliance Officer, or any other person in charge of the Conflict of Interest Policy;

– provision on communication and training on Conflicts of Interest;

– provision explaining where guidance may be obtained in case of questions or concerns; and

– provision on regular reporting of Conflicts of Interest and evaluation of the Policy.

Overall, I agree with these recommendations, but to me the principal value of the Guidelines lies more in the very fact that it exists than the particulars of its various provisions.

That is, perhaps because COIs are so widespread and diffuse (meaning not the subject of a unified legal regime), they often seem to discourage meaningful efforts to mitigate them in the type of programmatic way that one typically sees with anti-bribery and competition law. The Guidelines – issued by an organization with six million members – is an important step in the direction of making such approach a mainstream expectation.

(For more information on the components of a COI compliance program see the various entries and subentries under “Compliance” on the index on the left hand part of this blog – also available here.)

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