Operational transparency and internal selling of C&E programs

While all companies try to “sell” their  C&E programs, often such efforts are  not particularly robust. And that’s too bad, because the need for effective C&E program selling measures is considerable.  This is due in part to the behavioral ethics/psychology-related phenomenon that we tend to overestimate how ethical we are, which leads us to underestimate how much we need the kind of help that C&E programs can provide.  Also relevant here is the moral hazard/economics-related phenomenon that leads to a misalignment of risk vis a vis rewards in many companies when it comes to C&E, meaning that the internal “market” for C&E services in many companies is not an efficient one.  On top of both of these challenges is, at least in some companies, a growing sense of  “compliance fatigue.” With all these forces aligned against them, what should C&E professionals do to sell their programs in an effective manner?

A few years ago, in a paper published in Management Science – “The Labor Illusion: How Operational Transparency Increases Perceived Value”  – Ryan W. Buell and Michael I. Norton, both of the Harvard Business  School, reviewed the results of experiments involving  the near-ubiquitous experience of consumers reacting to wait times on web sites. They found that “when websites engage in operational transparency by signaling that they are exerting effort, people can actually prefer websites with longer waits to those that return instantaneous results—even when those results are identical.”   While the context is obviously not at all specific to C&E work, the general learning about individuals valuing services more positively when they understand the amount of effort involved in providing those services seems broadly applicable,  and worth considering for possible lessons to those seeking to “sell” C&E programs.

Operational transparency can, of course, play a role in C&E programs in various ways – most obviously through the day–to-day work of compliance officers in training on and otherwise communicating about a company’s standards of business conduct, work which is presumably well understood in a company.  Beyond this, employees generally have some understanding that a C&E officer receives and responds to reports of suspected wrongdoing. But there is, of course,  much more to a C&E program than these two functions, the depth and breadth of which is often unknown to (or under-appreciated by)  its  “customers”  – meaning the employees.

For some companies, what is needed to make a strong and positive impression on the work force is an annual C&E report.  Such reports typically summarize major efforts and accomplishments  of  a company’s C&E department in a given year, and thereby hopefully have the kind of impact that will make employees truly value what goes into the program.  To my mind, the opportunity to publish reports of this kind should be seen as “low hanging fruit” in more than a few companies – and I hope that C&E officers who don’t currently engage in this practice will revisit the issue at some point soon.

There are, however, two caveats to this suggestion.  First, in publicizing the work of a C&E department, one must be careful not to do anything that might indicate that the promise of confidentiality in responding to helpline calls and undertaking other sensitive inquiries could be compromised.   Second, as the authors of the paper state: “Whereas operational transparency involves firms being clearer in demonstrating the effort they exert on behalf of their customers—an ethically unproblematic strategy—inducing the illusion of labor moves closer to an ethical boundary,…” to which I would add that this should indeed be seen as over the line for any C&E professional.  More broadly, while C&E officers often should make greater efforts to sell themselves and what they do, they must be mindful of restraints that are particularly relevant to (with apologies to The Godfather) “the business [they have] chosen.”

For further reading see this post on annual C&E reports in Corporate Compliance Insights.

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