Compliance programs and the culture of care

Samuel Johnson once said: “It is more from carelessness about truth than from intentionally lying that there is so much falsehood in the world.” And carelessness is obviously at the root of many other types of wrongdoing too.

In a keynote speech at the just-concluded SCCE  10th annual Compliance and Ethics Institute, FBI director James Comey spoke of the need for companies to have a “culture of care” when it comes to cyber-security.  (Unfortunately the speech is not yet published on the FBI web site, so I can’t link to the text.)  While focusing on cyber-security, Comey did indicate that the concept of a culture of care might have broader application to the world of compliance and ethics.

I think the concept is indeed potentially quite useful for C&E professionals.  But what might be included in such a culture?

One example is suggested by a presentation – Beyond Agency Theory: The Hidden and Heretofore Inaccessible Power of Integrity, by Michael Jensen and Werner Erhard – discussed in this earlier post. The authors argue that honesty requires more than sincerity: “When giving their word, most people do not consider fully what it will take to keep that word.  That is, people do not do a cost/benefit analysis on giving their word.  In effect, when giving their word, most people are merely sincere (well-meaning) or placating someone, and don’t even think about what it will take to keep their word. This failure to do a cost/benefit analysis on giving one’s word is irresponsible.”    This argument makes sense to me – and I think it would to Samuel Johnson  and James Comey as well.

And, as noted above, the need for carefulness goes beyond being honest.  More broadly, a culture of care would help shape an organization’s values, policies, procedures, risk assessment, approach to incentives and  C&E training and communications.  As well, carelessness would be addressed sufficiently through the investigations and disciplinary policy/process – something that too few companies do, as discussed here.  

Finally, I asked Steve Priest, a true master at diagnosing and shaping corporate cultures, what he thinks about the “culture of care” concept.  He said “Emphasizing a ‘culture of care’ makes great sense. However for many who do not understand the full sense in which James Comey used the phrase, it will seem soft. It isn’t soft, but to balance it I encourage organizations to aim for these three in your culture: care, competence and courage. Organizations and leaders that demonstrate care, competence and courage may not win every sprint, but they will win most marathons.”

I agree with Steve that care alone cannot a culture make.  And, as with virtually any part of a C&E program, one has to guard against overdoing it.   In this connection, nearly 20 years ago, I was concerned that my then eight-year-old daughter occasionally ran out into the street without checking for traffic – and so to help make her more careful I tried to get her to keep a “safety journal.”  I’m proud (in retrospect) to say that she refused – as my idea was a bit over the top, and this story from the archives of Kaplan family compliance history helps to remind me that one must be careful not to promote over-cautiousness.

 

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